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Seven Must Know facts about Anorexia


Laura talks about the reality of laxative abuse


MusicalBethan talks body image and the pressure to be perfect. 


Savanna Brown talks Self Image and portrayal of girls in the Media. 


Laura talks coping with weight gain when recovering from an ED. 


Abs talks about how school can accommodate your mental illness. 

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Repeat after me:

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..

The number on the scale does not dictate my self worth..


YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL. The scale lies. You are amazing, beautiful, strong and gorgeous, just the way you are. Beauty is not dictated by protruding bones, thigh gaps or visible collar bones or ribs. Beauty is you, healthy and accepting and loving yourself just as you are.


Anonymous:
Have you ever been through camhs or something similar? If so, what for and what was your experience like? I've got an appointment there next week and I'm kinda scared

I have been through CAMHS actually :) I spent Seven/Eight months there between February and October 2012. For those of you who don’t know, CAMHs is short for ‘Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services’ and it’s a department of government dedicated to, as the name suggest, helping children dealing with serious mental health issues. As far as I am aware, CAMHS operates in Australia, Britain and New Zealand. 

My experience with CAMHS was largely a positive one. I was referred to Camhs after a prescription-drug overdose in December 2011 and was eventually admitted to their outpatient program in February the following year. 

At the time, I have to note, that I was very angry, lost and confused.. i probably wasn’t the easiest person to deal with. While my initial assessment was less then pleasant and I really didn’t want to return, I agreed to stick it out for at least a few sessions for my family’s sake- and I’m really glad I did. 

So, after the initial interview process, you’re invited back for an ‘assessment’ after which they will take your case to the board and decide whether or not you are eligible to be put on to their roster or put you on a waiting list. Then you are usually assigned a case-worker. I struck it lucky with my case-worker and it wound up being someone who I felt, by the end of it, I could trust. 

Camhs really helped me. I got the therapy I needed, I was able to consult with a psychiatrist to get my medication sorted and I managed to work through a fair few of my issues. 

The best advice I can give you about CAMHS or any mental health service is to go in with an open mind. I know it’s hard and, like me, you may not WANT to be there. Just remember that these people, even if they do seem detached, do want to help you- so just give them a chance <3 They can help you- if you let them :)

Stay strong! Give it a chance and let me know how it goes :)


Going through a rough time? Don’t be afraid to speak out.

Asking for help can be really hard, especially if you feel stressed or confused. Getting the support you need during tough times can help you get through the situation, give you strategies to deal with the situation and give you some perspective.

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Kati Morton talks on how to talk to your family, friends and parents about having an eating disorder <3